History

Understanding what has happened in the past and how this has shaped the development of our world is an essential part of understanding how we live in the   present. History examines different time periods and things which have happened have changed and shaped our world.

Vision

The fundamental objectives of the History department are based on a belief in the importance of history both as an academic discipline within the school curriculum, the value of which has been recognised by the government in encouraging students to opt for a humanities subject at Key Stage 4, and as an important foundation stone for living a productive and successful life beyond the confines of compulsory education.

The specific aims of the History department are that students should view history as a fun and interesting subject. All teachers within the department love and value the study of the past, and we want students to match this passion, generating an interest in the past that will remain with them for life.

Secondly, we wish to transmit knowledge and understanding of the past, both within the United Kingdom and of the wider world. Students should have an understanding of how the world we live in has been shaped by the past.

Finally, it is our aim that students continuously develop life skills such as thinking, evaluating, analysing, empathizing and communicating; there are very few jobs that do not require these skills. To this end, the most important skills we wish to develop are those of thinking and communicating. The ability to think imaginatively is the most fundamental skill to develop, but in order to express ideas, students must also be able to communicate effectively; after all, it is no good having a good idea if you cannot tell anyone about it.

As a team, we hope that we are able to develop and embed greater scholarship within the History curriculum, achieving ‘Awe and Wonder’ moments via trips such as the year 11 trip to the Battle of the Somme as well as other trips such as the year 7 trip to Warwick castle.

Key Stage 3

The two key themes of Ruling, and Living and Working are covered in each year group from Year 7 to 9.

Year 7

CONTENT

Key skills starting with a focus on Historical sources as well as an investigation into Historical time periods and chronology.  For key enquiry questions we will investigate interpretations of William’ victory at the battle of Hastings; Investigate how King William was able to control England after 1066; Interpreting how difficult life was for people during the Middle Ages; Who was the most successful Tudor Monarch and did the Industrial revolution lead to good or bad changes.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed based on levelled assessments from Essay writing (Why did William win the Battle of Hastings?) to Source analysis (Investigating source interpretations of William the conqueror). An end of year exam with a Source-based and extended writing section will also form part of their assessment as well as mini-exams at the end of every 10 week exam block.

Year 8

CONTENT

The Empire and the slave trade; Victorian London and the Jack the Ripper killings; World War One and the Battle of the Somme; The Holocaust and the persecution of the Jews from 1933-45; The US Civil Rights movement from 1955-68; Immigration in Post-War Britain.

ASSESSMENT

Students are assessed based on levelled assessments from extended writing (How far did treatment of the Jews change from 1933-45) to Source analysis (Investigating different interpretations of the outcome of the Battle of the Somme).  An end of year exam with a Source-based and extended writing section will also form part of their assessment as well as mini-exams at the end of every 10 week block.

Key Stage 4

GCSE History

CONTENT

Year 9:

  • Paper 1: Medicine in Britain, c1250–present and The British sector of the Western Front, 1914–18: injuries, treatment and the trenches (Paper 1: 30%: 1 Hour 15 Minutes Examination).
  • Paper 2: The reigns of King Richard I and King John, 1189–1216: (All of Paper 2: 40%: 1 Hour 45 Minutes Examination).

 

Year 10:

  • Paper 2: The reigns of King Richard I and King John, 1189–1216. (All of Paper 2: 40%: 1 Hour 45 Minutes Examination).
  • Paper 2: Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941–91. (All of Paper 2: 40%: 1 Hour 45 Minutes Examination).

 

Year 11

  • Paper 2: Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941–91 (Continued). (All of Paper 2: 40%: 1 Hour 45 Minutes Examination).
  • Paper 3: Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39. (Paper 3: 30%: 1 Hour 20 Minutes Examination)

 

ASSESSMENT

What skills will I be examined on?

AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the key features and characteristics of the periods studied: 35%.

A02: Explain and analyse historical events and periods studied using second order historical concepts: 35%

A03: Analyse, evaluate and use sources (contemporary to the period) to make substantiated judgements, in the context of historical events studied: 15%.

A04: Analyse, evaluate and make substantiated judgements about interpretations (including how and why interpretations may differ) in the context of historical events studied: 15%.

Key stage 5

A Level History

CONTENT AND ASSESSMENT

Year 12:

  • Unit 1: In search of the American Dream: the USA, c1917–96: Paper 1: 30%: 2 Hours 15 Minutes.
  • Unit 2: South Africa, 1948–94: from apartheid state to ‘rainbow nation.’ Paper 2: 20%: 1 Hour and 30 Minutes.

Year 13:

  • Unit 3: Lancastrians, Yorkists and Henry VII, 1399–1509. Paper 3: 30%: 2 Hours and 15 Minutes.
  • Unit 4: Coursework:  International relations: Appeasement during the Thirties.  (20%: 3,000-4,000 words assessment).